A Skilled Massachusetts Attorney Can Work to Recover Driving Rights With a Hardship License

In Massachusetts, the Registry of Motor Vehicles has many ways to suspend your right to operate a motor vehicle. Meaning you can lose your license or privilege to operate in Massachusetts for a variety of reasons. There are just a select few ways that a Hearing Officer at the Registry of Motor Vehicles can grant a Hardship License.

A Registry Hearings Officer can only consider the granting of a Hardship License or Work License for individuals in two situations:

  • If the individual’s driving privileges were suspended when he was identified as a habitual traffic offender.
  • If the individual was convicted for the first or second time of driving under the influence (DUI) and his driving rights were suspended because of that conviction.

That is it. If your license is suspended for any other reason, whether it is for a conviction for Leaving the Scene of an Accident, a Third Offense Operating Under the Influence, or even for refusing the breathalyzer test—just to name a few—there are no Hardships available from the Registry.

Is it Worth the Effort?

Whether it is worth your time and frustration going to meet with a Registry Hearings Officer depends entirely on the reason your license is suspended. Some other questions that need to be considered are whether you have served enough of the suspension for a Hearings Officer to even consider granting a Hardship License and whether there is any evidence that you have operated a motor vehicle during the suspension.

The Registry requires a number of different documents depending on what type of license suspension you are seeking a Hardship License for. Gilman Law offers free consultations and would be happy to speak with you today. As a former Hearings Officer with the Registry of Motor Vehicles, attorney Gilman will be able to quickly understand your situation and walk you through the options you may have available. Attorney Gilman will be able to tell you whether you would be eligible for a Hardship License from the Registry of Motor Vehicles or whether you would need to seek relief from the Board. Even if you may not be eligible for a Hardship License from the Registry of Motor Vehicles, the Board of Appeals has greater authority to grant relief.

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